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What is the appropriate role for a Transition Committee?

While a Condominium or HOA deed-restricted community is in its sales period, the developer will control the operation of the governing condominium association or HOA by appointing the majority members of the Board of Directors of the Association. Often, either through the impetus of the developer, or organically through the efforts of interested owners, a transition committee of owners will be formed during developer control to begin preparations for the takeover of association control by the unit/lot owners.  

 Motivating the Developer to Meet its Turnover Obligations

With a recalcitrant developer, sometimes it is the role of the transition committee to remind the developer of its turnover obligations both as far as the timing of turnover and  the documentation which is required to be turned over by the developer at the time of transition.  

 Information Gathering

The primary role of a transition is information gathering.  This can be from various sources.  Under both the Florida Condominium (Chap. 718) and Homeowner Association (Chap. 720) Acts, unit or lot owners are entitled to request and inspect a myriad of association documents including contracts, financial information, and board and association minutes.  Documents and records pertaining to the community can also be accessed.  These would include the development order for the community on file with the municipality or county involved, building department records and correspondence, and records retained by the applicable water management district.

 Interaction with Governmental/Regulatory Authorities

The pre-transition period is an appropriate time for a transition committee to introduce itself to county/city and other regulatory officials.  Often there is a completion bond placed by the developer with the county or city.  The transition committee is in the position to educate local officials on what requirements have not been met by the developer in order to justify the release of the bond and to embolden local officials to condition the release of the bond on the completion of these requirements.  For water management districts, there are sometimes compliance issues which the developer may have failed to address which the district can be reminded of in the hope that the district will push for compliance while the developer remains in control.  

 Condition Inspections

The transition committee can inspect the common areas of the property and provide a list of concerns to the developer.  If such a list is provided, it should be made clear that it was compiled without the assistance of third-party experts and is not intended to be all-inclusive.  The developer is free to undertake the repair of items on the list.  The transition committee, however, should not in any way be representing that it is “signing off” on any of the repairs, as it lacks the authority to do so.

 Promoting a Slate of Candidates for the Initial Owner-Controlled Board

Because the transition committee has put in the “sweat equity” to discover and understand the challenges which will need to be confronted by the owner-controlled board upon transition, it makes sense that the transition committee should run and promote a slate of candidates for the owner-controlled board upon transition.

 What the Transition Committee Should Not Do

The transition committee does not have the authority to settle anything with the developer.  It should avoid “signing off” on any lists of repairs/actions by the developer, or purporting to bind the unit or lot owners in any way.  The committee is a voluntary group of owners with no recognized authority and in its communications with the developer and others the committee should reiterate this.

 Conclusion

A transition committee can serve a valuable purpose in reminding the developer of its obligations, preparing the community for transition, and empowering governmental and regulatory officials in holding the developer to account.  The committee, however, should scrupulously avoiding overstepping its authority or purporting to approve any proposals put forth by the developer. 


Article Authored by Alan E. Tannenbaum, Board Certified in Construction Law, is the Managing Partner of Tannenbaum Scro Lemole & Kleinberg’s construction and litigation sections. Mr. Tannenbaum received his undergraduate degree with honors from the University of Miami in 1975 and his juris doctorate from Florida State University in 1978.